Hyperbole and fences

Don’t you just get the impression that they’re making it up as they go along? Brexit Minister, David Davis inadvertently said something that might perceived as having positive implications for Scotland, and the British establishment hurriedly trots out its tame ‘experts’ to snort and guffaw at any suggestion that anything could ever work out well for independent Scotland. Quite apart from the brazen lies, the asinine scare-mongering and the empty promises, what makes the British nationalist propaganda so devoid of credibility is its unrelenting negativity. The obdurate insistence that independence can have absolutely no redeeming qualities whatever. The rigid dogma which holds that there cannot ever be anything even remotely good about Scotland being a normal country. That independence must inevitably be an unmitigated, ruinous, cataclysmic, sky-collapsing catastrophe.

This portrayal is so much at odds with observable reality and lived experience that, other than for ideologically committed hard-line unionists who are incapable of questioning anything that comes wrapped in a union flag, the propaganda is self-defeating. It almost contradicts itself.

People just know that things are rarely if ever that clear-cut in the real world. Few things are as utterly devoid of redeeming features as British nationalists want to persuade us is the case with independence. People are generally not stupid. Or, at least, not as stupid as the British state’s puerile propaganda assumes. They look around and they see all those scores of other countries that are both independent and not reduced to a disease-ridden, crime-wracked midden of despair and misery such as Brits envisage as the certain fate of Scotland absent the guiding grace of Britannia’s beneficent hand.

This absolutist approach is evident in the matter that is the subject of this article. The ‘hard border issue’. The British nationalists have decided that the term ‘hard border’ is scary, and nothing can be allowed to dilute the doom-laden implications of the phrase. It’s all so woefully simplistic. A ‘hard border’ must ensue as a consequence of Scotland choosing to normalise its constitutional status. A ‘hard border’ is a very bad thing. Therefore, independence is a very bad thing. This is the kind of stuff that was considered too insultingly low-brow for inclusion in ‘Politics for Dummies’. But we’re supposed to just meekly accept it.

We’re not supposed to ask who it is that’s creating this ‘hard border’. We’re not supposed to be able to figure out that it would be the choice of the rUK Government, NOT the Scottish Government. We’re not supposed to be clever enough to wonder what the implications would be for businesses in rUK. Or how those businesses would react to a government imposing onerous restrictions on trade and travel.

We’re not supposed to possess the intellectual wherewithal to wonder whether a ‘hard border’ is actually likely to materialise. Or whether it is as significant a threat to Scotland as the British nationalist propaganda would have us believe.

We’re not supposed to question. We’re not supposed to think. We’re just expected to react to buttons being pressed like good little sheeple.

We’re certainly not supposed to say, “So what!?” We’re not supposed to take the position that, if British nationalists want to wall themselves into a a self-imposed ghetto, that’s up to them. We may find the idea repugnant. But if that is the choice they’ve made, who are we to gainsay them? In the ethos of Scotland’s civic nationalism, independence is not isolation but the capacity to freely negotiate the terms on which nations associate. If, by democratic means, rUK opts for relationships based on exclusiveness, detachment and distrust then the rest of the world must respect this choice.

Scotland cannot be expected to forego its potential and abandon its aspirations for the sake of pandering to British nationalist threats of self-harm, any more than we should be deterred from bringing our government home by the ludicrously overblown atmosphere of menace that an increasingly ridiculous looking British establishment is striving to associate with the entirely normal condition of being an independent nation.

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8 thoughts on “Hyperbole and fences

  1. Ian Clark

    A rant.

    But it’s an articulate and accurate one which incisively reveals the poverty of unionist propaganda.

    In a word – brilliant.

  2. Frank Anderson

    The British Nationalists movement are the ones who are fearful the most.Since the last few hundred years the majority of the world was pink. Now the common wealth is all but gone no disrespect to those who are still actively included in it. The BN fear campaign is not that much of a threat really, IF we ask why are they so scared of an independent Scotland, that they have resort to this type of verbage . What rUK have left after Scotland gains independence Dodgy untrustworthy politicians and self serving bankers printing and spending monies they do not have hence the debt in the trillions.A series of past PMs who in any country should be subject to litigation for war crimes, Telling lies to the public and expecting them to believe them Think of the hard border twixt Scotland and England it works both wnays do the BN think that their englishness will allow them into Scotland. History has taught if nothing that The Devine RIght of kings (or English people) ceased with James the VIth or 1st whichever side of the hard border you are on.

  3. Proud Cybernat

    So what if rUK wants to put up a hard border. Different countries tend to have borders. There are borders – even hard borders – all over Europe. Big deal. It’ll take me a bit longer to pass through. More BritNat zoomery, scaremongering drivel.

    BTW – will planes have to stop mid-flight to pass through this hard rUK border? Just asking like.

  4. Dorothy Bruce

    I may have this wrong, but surely if rUK imposes a hard border between it and an indy Scotland, the stuff it imports from us will be dearer to buy for them. Now there are those who say they will ban all goods from Scotland and buy elsewhere. But where?

    RUK will be surrounded by hard borders (look at a map), and until it can get trade deals sorted out with the EU (of which we will be part so they cannot treat us differently) and with other countries (which could take many years), then at present they are merely pontificating about cutting off their own nose to spite their face.

  5. Jockanese Wind Talker

    On the subject of fences how much is the Scottish tax payer contributing to the “UK funded wall being built near the so-called Jungle migrant camp in Calais”

  6. Roddy Scott

    Is it possible that rUK will buy Trump’s unuseable fence and install that?
    Surely, now that Trump is going to lead the free world, he will no longer have a use for it and he will give it to them at a bargain price.
    After all, are we not England’s equivalent of the US’s Mexicans?

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